Select Page
What are you listen...
 
Notifications
Clear all

[Sticky] What are you listening to tonight?! 🤔

231 Posts
10 Users
342 Reactions
7,052 Views
(@capriccio)
Stalwart Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 270
 

Oh, this is lovely, @jen

In the past couple of years I have come to be more and more in love with Rameau. I still have so much to explore of his work and I keep on coming across new delights. "Le Rappel des oiseaux" is so playful, and then "La Cupis" is so dreamy. 

Another delight of my last 10 years of listening to music is being exposed to so many musicians and composers from the far, far north of the globe. They were so rarely a part of musical upbringing in the Antipodes.


   
Hugh and Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Posted by: @capriccio

more and more in love with Rameau

The first time I heard Rameau was in the gardens of Versailles - yes, I know, that’s almost too appropriate to be true 😊 - and it’s been an enduring love from that moment.

My relationship with Debussy is more stormy, very on-off.

So I’m astonished how, in the hands of Ólafsson, the ear can slip so smoothly back and forth between the two composers.  Their word-painting is so different, yet so similar.

It’s a puzzle, though, how Debussy’s Hommage à Rameau is a homage to Rameau!


   
Hugh reacted
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

Posted by: @jen

Víkingur Ólafsson: Debussy-Rameau

What a beautiful album. Thank you!

[Have you been able to access the booklet?]


   
Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Posted by: @hugh

Have you been able to access the booklet?

Sadly not. Have you?


   
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

@jen No I looked on Idagio but saw no Booklet link. It's a shame not to be able to read Ólafsson's comments on his choices.


   
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Posted by: @hugh

It's a shame not to be able to read Ólafsson's comments on his choices.

I’ve just had a look on the Presto site, and found this interview:

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/articles/3180--interview-vikingur-olafsson-on-debussy-and-rameau

Fascinating!  (And so Hommage really is an enigma, in that there is no trace of pastiche.  But I find Ólafsson’s discussion of the tribute to be very compelling.)

 


   
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

@jen

Thanks for the link to that fascinating discussion. I had wondered what similarities I was supposed to be hearing between the two composers' music, so I'm relieved to read that Ólafsson was "not trying to prove that Rameau was an Impressionist or that Debussy was Baroque." To my ears, although the Rameau pieces were obviously from a very different era they were not all as baroque as I expected. With some of them I heard similarities with Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words.
 
I loved the album, not least the gorgeous sound of the piano. I've never really heard Rameau's music before and I look forward to discovering more.

   
Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Posted by: @hugh

With some of them I heard similarities with Mendelssohn's Songs Without Words.

That’s an enticing comparison - I must reacquaint myself with the Songs Without Words!


   
Hugh reacted
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

I've been bowled over by this stunning performance of Shostakovich's 3rd quartet

https://music.apple.com/us/album/walton-shostakovich-string-quartets/1645169272


   
Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Thanks @hugh - and wow! A stunning performance indeed, and so different to how I’m used to hearing this quartet.  I love the delicacy, the rawness and, at times, a sound so sinister that the hairs stand up on the back of my neck.

[What would David Hurwitz make of it? 😁]

The Walton quartet is well outside my usual listening; it’ll take a few listenings to get to grips with it… or not 😊


   
Hugh reacted
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

@Jen I'm very glad you enjoyed it. The record was chosen by one of the Gramophone reviewers (Amy Blier-Carruthers) as her album of the year. Her review began: "What can I say? This is just a fantastic recording. It sounds great. The playing is erudite and courageous, and it's quite simply the best thing I've heard all year." Even though I'd previously tried and failed to come to terms with the Walton, and even though the review had more to say about it than about the Shostakovich, after reading that I felt the album must be worth a listen.

For me, I think it'll take more than a few listens to come to terms with the Walton. I find the very beginning a bit off-putting, but I'm beginning to get there.

But I agree with all that you've written about the Shostakovich. The third quartet is, along with number 7, one of my top two. The Shostakovich String Quartets website Shostakovich's String Quartet No. 3 (quartets.de) quotes one of the members of the Beethoven Quartet:

"Only once did we see Shostakovich visibly moved by his own music. We were rehearsing his Third Quartet. He'd promised to stop us when he had any remarks to make. Dmitri Dmitriyevich sat in an armchair with the score opened out. But after each movement ended he just waved us on, saying, 'Keep playing!' So we performed the whole quartet. When we finished playing he sat quite still in silence like a wounded bird, tears streaming down his face. This was the only time that I saw Shostakovich so open and defenceless."

As for Hurwitz, perhaps the Albion Quartet's name alone might be enough to put him off!


   
Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Posted by: @hugh

"Only once did we see Shostakovich visibly moved by his own music…

It’s so lovely to read that reminiscence from the Beethoven Quartet.

Posted by: @hugh

As for Hurwitz, perhaps the Albion Quartet's name alone might be enough to put him off!

😂


   
Hugh reacted
ReplyQuote
 Hugh
(@hugh)
Forum Champ
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 281
 

I've recently been enjoying getting to know some of Mozart's piano and violin sonatas thanks to this album from Faust and Melnikov  https://music.apple.com/gb/album/mozart-sonatas-for-fortepiano-violin-vol-3/1611172133?ls

They conjure gorgeous sounds from their fortepiano and gut-strung violin.


   
Jen reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

Thank you for this recommendation!

I’m very, very fond of the Variations of KV377, and this is such a lovely performance.  

I’m used to hearing this sonata performed by Anne-Sophie Mutter and Lambert Orkis, with delightful playing from Orkis (although Mutter can sometimes a bit strident for my taste).

In this recording the fortepiano and gut strings create an entirely different soundworld.  It takes a moment to adjust to but I agree, it’s a gorgeous sound, both compelling and very moving.  What a treat it would be to hear Faust and Melnikov play the E minor Sonata, KV304?

[edit: my wish is granted - I’ve just discovered KV304 is on the first volume of the series 😊]


   
Hugh reacted
ReplyQuote
 Jen
(@jen)
Stalwart
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 433
 

And… I’ve just remembered the doppelgänger of the KV377 Variations - well, to my ears anyway 😊 - the final movement of the D minor String Quartet, KV421.

Other quartets take this movement quickly and lightly, but I’m drawn to Quatuor Ebène’s interpretation of ma non troppo in this more pensive performance:

https://app.idagio.com/albums/mozart-string-quartets-A22BB74F-9169-4D68-99E9-3592C22FA355

Just lovely!


   
ReplyQuote
Page 14 / 16