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Favourite film soundtracks?

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(@jchokey)
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Then there's the question of music that was originally written for a film, but then subsequently reworked into an orchestral piece? 

Like Vaughan Williams revising his score for "Scott of the Antarctic" into "Sinfonia Antartica".


   
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(@jchokey)
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Hmm... this may be a bit of a tangent that deserves a separate thread, but I'm wondering if there's an analogy between, say, film scores and ballet music.  Both are originally intended to accompany a specific story-telling performance that includes predominantly visual elements, but the music of both can sometimes become a stand alone piece of program music, without also needing the other aspects of the performance.

 


   
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(@dinah)
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Posted by: @jchokey

As an obsessively nit-picking categorizer, I would suggest that this might not be a third category, but a subcategory of 1.

🤔 Excellent point!


   
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(@dinah)
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Posted by: @jchokey

but I'm wondering if there's an analogy between, say, film scores and ballet music.  Both are originally intended to accompany a specific story-telling performance that includes predominantly visual elements,

Another good point, there!

 

Indeed, sometimes the music is so wonderful, evocative and expressive that it stands the test of time and occasion, and can be enjoyed alone without its sibling visual performance, be it ballet or acting or even folklore dance!

 


   
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(@dinah)
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Let me think out loud with you folk for a moment, ok?!

On another thread @Jen linked to the album https://app.idagio.com/albums/56010c0e-6575-4c40-bafa-fa281ff99481

and on it was a wonderful string quartet no. 3 by Philip Glass, originally wrote as a score for the film "Mishima"!

I'd never been aware of the film's protagonist before: a famous, and apparently infamous, Japanese writer, let alone a film about him. I looked it up (through means not necessarily "kosher"), and decided to watch it. And boy was it a very good watch!, and the music certainly is a fine specimen of @jchokey 's description of music that's

Posted by: @jchokey

originally intended to accompany a specific story-telling performance that includes predominantly visual elements, but the music of both can sometimes become a stand alone piece of program music,

 

Now then, the question that begs asking is: why is this string quartet considered a part of the "classical repertoire", featured on a number of albums and played in classical concerts? Why isn't it considered just a "film score", an ingenious, atmospheric film score, but still... a film score?

Can it be because it's by THE Philip Glass?! Can it be because he's a composer of operas and orchestral works that we instantly qualify all his output as "classical" music?! Or is it something inherent in the music itself?! Maybe, like I said before, it stood

Posted by: @dinah

the test of time and occasion, and can be enjoyed alone without its sibling visual performance,

 

P. S. I absolutely love Philip Glass' work, so my reminiscences are not intended as an attack or anything.


   
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(@capriccio)
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Posted by: @dinah

Now then, the question that begs asking is: why is this string quartet considered a part of the "classical repertoire", featured on a number of albums and played in classical concerts? Why isn't it considered just a "film score", an ingenious, atmospheric film score, but still... a film score?

Can it be because it's by THE Philip Glass?! Can it be because he's a composer of operas and orchestral works that we instantly qualify all his output as "classical" music?! Or is it something inherent in the music itself?

So glad you asked this, Dinah. I haven't had time to post anything earlier today, but I was ruminating about this film music discussion and classical snobbery. I'm a bit too tired to write clearly about this right now, but I do think there's a lot of prejudice against film music as being too "popular" to be counted as classical. Of course, if it's written by Glass or Rota or Vaughan Williams, it gets the classical imprimatur. But if it's written by John Williams or James Horner, what then?

It makes me think of people who scorn science fiction novels, but then say that 1984 and Brave New World are literature, not sci fi. 

Is something that's popular necessarily too "low culture" to be literature or classical music?


   
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 Jen
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Posted by: @dinah

Now then, the question that begs asking is: why is this string quartet considered a part of the "classical repertoire", featured on a number of albums and played in classical concerts? Why isn't it considered just a "film score", an ingenious, atmospheric film score, but still... a film score?

In this particular case I understand it was Glass himself who decided the music had a life outside of the film - on the concert stage - and hence called it his 3rd string quartet.

But your question is a very interesting one, and I tread tentatively because I have so little knowledge of the world of film.
 
I’m thinking that there are two distinct things here: the application of the labels, and any prejudice that may be associated with those labels.

Who drives the labels, where is the prejudice, and are the sources the same? Is the audience?  Or the film/record/concert producers? In the case of labels, I’m wondering: is it simply that, say, Glass regards himself as a composer of classical music, while Williams considers himself a composer of film scores? Would Williams prefer to be known as a classical composer?!?

 

[In my own view, classical music and film scores are simply two genres of music with huge scope for overlap and influence, and neither in any way superior to the other.  But perhaps that is atypical?]


   
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(@lillienola)
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Lawrence Of Arabia, Harry Potter And The Sorcerer‘s Stone, Star Wars, Ben-Hur, Seven Years In Tibet, The Hours, The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. 


   
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 Jen
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Posted by: @lillienola

The Lord Of The Rings trilogy. 

The Lord of the Rings films are among so many I’ve never seen.  But I first heard Schumann’s symphonies while reading the books and the two became irrevocably linked.  Fantastical creatures, benevolent and malevolent, burst into my imagination whenever I listen to Spring or Rhenish or the others… And just a mention of Tolkien will trigger the symphonies in my mind.

Hmmm… I wonder what would happen if I ever got to see one of the films?  Would the Schumann soundtrack be overwritten?


   
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(@nenad)
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Posted by: @jen

I wonder what would happen if I ever got to see one of the films?

I think you should give it a try. Howard Shore did an excellent job with the music for the trilogy. The movies have their flaws but music is certainly not one of them. In fact, it is quite the opposite - the soundtrack is, IMHO, the strong point of the trilogy. And yes, it is a full-blooded symphonic music which is suitable even for "standalone" listening. 

My 2¢.


   
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(@capriccio)
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On the Super Duper Deluxe Collector's Edition (or some such label) of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, which includes all sorts of extras, there's a wonderful segment on the writing and recording of the music - sometimes being done overnight to meet production deadlines. It's fascinating watching a composer write on demand.


   
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(@eldarboy)
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1. The soundtrack to the TV series Brideshead Revisited composed by Geoffrey Burgon; and,

2. Heimat 2 composed by Nikos Mamangakis.


   
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 Hugh
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Posted by: @eldarboy

Heimat 2

I haven't seen Heimat 2 since it was shown on TV here in 1993. I don't remember the theme music but I do recall some of the music making in the circle of artistic friends.

However, I definitely would agree with the soundtrack for the original Heimat series. Just thinking about it now brings to mind many scenes from in and around the village.


   
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(@eldarboy)
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There is a three disc set of all the music from the series, one devoted to each part, available on a website in Germany that is devoted to the Heimat series; however, they will not ship to Canada or US😢😢


   
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